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The Day-to-Day: Artist Renee Bouchon on Inspiration, Creative Process, and the Business of Art

Photo Courtesy of Renee Bouchon

Atlanta-based artist Renée Bouchon is a Land of Belle favorite. Her approachable, abstract works add beautiful color and spirit to any interior they inhabit. Born and raised in New Orleans, Renée takes great inspiration from the eclectic city’s celebration of art and music, and also from her travels, particularly those to Rome, the Amalfi Coast, Big Sur and New York. We sat down with the artist to learn about the thinking and process behind her works, her greatest inspirations, and what Renée’s day-to-day looks like working as a fine artist.

WHAT MADE YOU START PAINTING?
I started painting professionally in 2007 as a secondary creative outlet from my current, fast-paced job in Advertising.  As much as I loved the ad world, painting always seemed to be an escape for me and so eventually I transitioned to it full time.

DESCRIBE THE LOOK AND FEEL OF YOUR WORK.
My work is predominately abstract created from oils, gouaches, acrylics, charcoals, pastels and inks…a true mixed medium dialogue. I’ve recently gotten into collage work which I love as well because if flexes a different creative muscle in terms of color relationships, shapes and composition. I focus on creating works with layers of varying hues all having a conversation with one another.  You will almost always find rigid charcoal lines throughout my paintings to help deepen the story of texture and depth. I love the use of white and black against rich ochres, Moroccan blues, and bright vermillions. I enjoy creating unexpected colors that you can’t buy.

 

Renee’s work from left to right: ‘Fausto I,’ ‘Fausto II,’ Queenie I, and Queenie II. Photos Courtesy of Renee Bouchon.

WHAT IS THE CREATIVE PROCESS LIKE FOR YOU?
My works are truly a dialogue I have with myself and the canvas.  It could take months before a painting is finished because the evolution is slow and thoughtful. I want people to want to look at my paintings and see their own story in them. Layer after layer, uncovering and covering, leaning in and stepping back…

 

WHICH ARTISTS INSPIRE YOUR WORK?
Rothko, Frankenthaler, Motherwell, de Kooning, Twombly, Diebenkorn, and Mitchell, to name a few. I’m very inspired by the 1940’s art scene in NYC where so many of the abstract expressionist painters I admire came out of.

 

IF YOU COULD PICK THREE PIECES OF ART TO OWN (REALISTIC OR UNREALISTIC E.G. THE MONA LISA LOL), WHICH WOULD YOU PICK?
Low Water by Joan Mitchell, “Jacob’s Ladder” by Helen Frankenthaler, andWhite Cloud over Purple” by Mark Rothko.

 

NAME THREE OF YOUR FAVORITE MUSEUMS IN THE WORLD.
MOMA, Louvre, Guggenheim

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL WORK DAY LOOK LIKE?
There really is not a typical day.  I strive and strive to get in a “routine.” I usually check emails in the morning, inspo gather and then hit the canvas or paper and work until I need a recharge.  I try and designate a day a week to focus on shipments. I also just hired a communications manager (yay!) who has GREATLY helped me with all of the admin things so I can fill a lot more of my day with what I truly love…

WHAT’S THE MOST REWARDING PART OF WORKING AS AN ARTIST?
Putting a little piece of yourself into the world making it that much more lovely and watching a client’s face when they see their painting for the first time.  There truly is nothing better than to give joy and experience it being received.

Renee’s new studio. Photo Courtesy of Renee Bouchon.

WHAT DOES YOUR WORK SPACE LOOK LIKE?
I was recently working out of a home studio which was a little upstairs bungalow with vaulted ceilings and hardwoods.  It was quaint and cozy and so nice to be able to finish my morning coffee and trot right upstairs to begin my day. I recently moved into a larger studio which is big and open and has fabulous industrial style windows with amazing light, white walls and floors and high ceilings.  It’s big and open and I feel like I can freely paint and not worry about what gets where. It’s wonderful. I’m excited to see what creations come of this fresh space.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHERS WHO WANT TO RUN THEIR OWN BUSINESS CREATING ART?
One key piece of advice I would give is that success does not happen overnight.  It takes a lot of hard work, focus, patience and perseverance. With the rise of social media and everyone and anyone “picking up a paintbrush” and calling themselves artists, you need to find ways to cut through the clutter and really stand out and have your own voice, vision and POV and learn how to translate that back out into the world.  It’s not easy and at times can feel downright impossible. When everyone is going right, go left. Also, there is an entirely separate business side of being a full time artist that lives outside of purely creating. You need to be able to see the full picture understand how to get your art seen and out into the world…it’s an intricate dance for sure and I’m definitely still figuring it out.  Always stay inspired and learn how to glean little doses of inspiration from your everyday…it’s everywhere.

Photo Courtesy of Renee Bouchon.

ALARM GOES OFF AT: 8 AM.  I’m unfortunately not a morning person but envy everyone else who is…

WORK STARTS AT: Honestly, every single day is different but I usually always begin by checking emails around 9 AM.

WORK ENDS AT: I always struggle with this.  I feel like it never really ends b/c even when I stop painting let’s say around 5 or so, I’m constantly gleaning inspiration from books, magazines, you name it.  I have a very hard time turning my brain off from “work”…it’s in my DNA. It’s a blessing and a curse but I wouldn’t change that for a second.

TYPICAL BED TIME: 10-10:30

COFFEE/TEA ORDER: Can’t begin without a mug of coffee (with a splash of milk and brown sugar) in the morning and have recently been having a cup of tea midafternoon.

HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR DAY: When I get to paint. No commissions. No deadlines. No end goals. No to-do’s. But truly just paint for me and let the juices flow. It’s where the work I get the most excited about stems from.

Renee’s work from left to right: ‘Falling Blue,’ ‘Tremolo‘, ‘La Palina,’ and ‘Door to the Sea.’ All pieces available for purchase on Land of Belle. Photos Courtesy of Renee Bouchon.

MOST ANNOYING OR CHALLENGING PART OF YOUR DAY: Shipping!

WORKING FROM HOME, LOVE OR HATE? Love

SKILL THAT DOESN’T COME NATURALLY TO YOU BUT WISH IT DID: Taking more risks.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING WHAT YOU DO NOW, WHAT WOULD YOU WANT TO DO: I would love to work at a gallery or museum.

ONE QUALITY THAT MAKES YOU GOOD AT WHAT YOU DO: Having worked on the Account Management side of the ad world for as long as I did has helped me learn how to deal with clients, market myself and be smart about how to approach certain aspects of my business.

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Faraway Lands: Indagare CEO Melissa Biggs Bradley on the Best of Beirut

 

​As founder and CEO of the members-only travel company, Indagare, Melissa Biggs Bradley is constantly on the road scouting up-and-coming destinations and revisiting favorite ones (she traveled 118 days last year!). When she is in the office, Melissa works hands on with her team to curate Insider Journeys—special, immersive travel experiences around the world to places like Egypt, Lisbon, and Havana. Recently back from Beirut, Lebanon, where she was scouting for an upcoming journey in collaboration with Architectural Digest, we sat down with Melissa to learn about her favorite trips of the past year, travel go-tos, and the beautiful and complicated city of Beirut, which thanks to her, has risen to the top of our travel wishlist.

 

TELL US ABOUT INDAGARE.
Indagare is a members-only, boutique travel-planning company offering curated content, customized trip-planning and bespoke group trips around passion points. We help our members realize their travel visions by designing special journeys and unlocking behind-the-scenes access and exclusive perks.

 

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO START THE COMPANY?
When I founded Indagare, I wanted to create a new platform for exchange between like-minded, passionate travelers. My aim was to bring together an engaged community and a top-notch booking service to allow for more memorable journeys and meaningful global connections. 

 

WHAT IS YOUR ROLE THERE TODAY? WHAT DOES YOUR DAY-TO-DAY LOOK LIKE?
As Founder and CEO, I am constantly on the road scouting up-and-coming destinations and revisiting favorite ones (I traveled 118 days last year). When I am in the office, I’m working hands-on with my team; right now with our Insider Journeys team we are developing and planning special, immersive experiences around the world in places like Egypt, Lebanon, Lisbon and Havana.

 

Beirut. Photo Courtesy of Melissa Biggs Bradley.


THREE MOST MEMORABLE TRIPS IN 2018?
I began last year with a trip to Saudi Arabia, where I was moved by the destination’s larger-than-life cultural treasures (such as Al-Ula), and the fact that we were some of the few tourists to experience them. There is a real magic to visiting a destination on the cusp of change.

In the fall, I traveled to one of my favorite cities in the world, Marrakech, on Indagare’s Insider Journey with Architectural Digest. The trip offered behind-the-scenes tours of private homes and gardens, including Villa Oasis, the former home of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé. We had cocktails at Marisa Berenson’s villa and meals at other private homes and clubs and lots of shopping, of course.

Then in November, we took over the best boat on the Nile, the Oberoi Philae, for an Insider Journey. Our group was able to meet with the legendary Dr. Zaha Hawassi to hear about the latest archaeological discoveries and also to get a hard-hat tour of the Grand Egyptian Museum, which is not yet open. We got to go into the labs where conservationists are restoring all of King Tut’s more than 5,000 treasures so we were within inches of some of the boy king’s personal belongings, which was amazing. The crowds still have not returned to Egypt, so it is a place that I think people should rush to now before it becomes overwhelmed with visitors. We are offering a number of trips there this year for that reason.

 

ANY TIPS TO BEAT JET LAG?
Many flight attendants swear by this trick: eat something healthy and easy to digest before your flight, then stick to water while in the air. The idea is that avoiding salty airplane food prevents bloating and lethargy, while drinking only water keeps your digestive system from having to work extra hard once you land, reserving your body’s energy for helping you stay awake. 

 

NAME THREE ITEMS ALWAYS IN YOUR CARRY ON?
Serum to hydrate my face and neck before the flight, a cashmere wrap to keep warm, and pouches of different sizes for jewelry, tech accessories, toiletries and documents.

 

LATELY, YOU’VE BEEN DREAMING OF A TRIP TO…
Uzbekistan. I’ve been to Samarakand and loved seeing the intersection of Asian, Persian and Mediterranean civilizations along the Silk Road, but would like to spend more time there. Indagare is hosting an Insider Journey there this fall with textile designer John Robshaw hosting it, and I would love to be able to join. 

 

Sarah’s Bags. Photo Courtesy of Melissa Biggs Bradley.


ON TO BEIRUT. WHEN DID YOU VISIT? HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU VISITED IF MORE THAN ONCE?
I was there in January for the first time to scout the Insider Journey trip that we are offering with Architectural Digest this spring. I had planned a trip in 2012 and had to cancel because of tensions in the region but it surpassed my very high expectations and I am looking forward to returning soon. 

 

DESCRIBE IT TO SOMEONE WHO HAS NEVER BEEN?
Beirut is a modern and multi-layered city with many cultural paradoxes; it’s a place where you’ll find precious ancient ruins that span civilizations juxtaposed with bullet-riddled buildings and sleek modern architecture by Zaha Hadid and Herzog and de Meuron. Religions coexist and have for centuries and you find the melding of cultures in its food, architecture and the fact that most people are trilingual, speaking English, French and Arabic. The city sits on the Mediterranean with the mountains behind it but there are scars of its many wars that are also present. The food and hospitality are legendary. And thanks to a newly formed government, the city is rising again and embracing creative energy fueled by its inhabitants’ heritage, innovation and serious grit. 

 

WHAT TIME OF YEAR WOULD YOU RECOMMEND GOING?
Beirut has a relatively mild climate; even in winter, the temperature does not drop much below 50°, but summer can be muggy and hot. Spring and fall are the best time to go, when temperatures are in the 60s and 70s.

 

DESCRIBE A PERFECT DAY IN BEIRUT. (*for a first-time visitor)
I would spend the morning exploring the historical city and archaeological sites and Ottoman mosques, ancient churches and Roman baths, before lunch at Tawlet, which serves delicious regional recipes prepared by female home cooks. Then you can spend the afternoon museum-hopping (see recommendations below) or delving into the city’s shopping scene, with a tour of a few innovative local boutiques. Finish the day with dinner at Liza, one of the most stylish restaurants in Beirut, with a fashionable crowd to match.

 

Tawlet. Photo Courtesy of Tanya Traboulsi.


WHAT ARE YOUR MUST-SEE SIGHTS?
The city center’s many mosques, the Pigeon’s Grotto rock formation, the Grand Serail (the headquarters of the Prime Minister of Lebanon)—not to mention the museums. Byblos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, is located roughly 20 miles north of Beirut. The ancient Roman ruins at Tyre and Baalbek are in areas that are currently not considered safe to visit but when that changes, they would be on my list for day two. 

 

NAME 2-3 BEST RESTAURANTS. WHAT WOULD YOU RECOMMEND ORDERING?
Em Sherif, for a big night out with shisha and music; Liza, for glamorous rooms and memorable mezze; and Falafel Sahyoun for the best tahini to takeaway. Order classics, such as falafels, hummus, tabbouleh and shwarma, and don’t miss knafeh, a cheese-filled semolina dough soaked in sweet syrup.

 

Em Sherif. Photo Courtesy of Em Sherif.


ANY GREAT PLACES FOR COCKTAILS AND COFFEE?
Be sure to visit a rooftop bar to take in the views. Hotel Albergo has a charming rooftop restaurant with views over the city and lantern-lit tables. Another favorite is Skybar, which overlooks the sea on the waterfront. For coffee, go for a warm latte from BackBurner Coffee Shop

 

WHERE WOULD YOU RECOMMEND STAYING WHILE VISITING AND WHY?
Le Gray is a sexy modern choice located in the heart of downtown. The Four Seasons is the city’s largest luxury hotel, a gleaming skyscraper overlooking the harbor.

 

The Four Seasons on Beirut. Photo Courtesy of the Four Seasons Hotel.


WHAT ARE THE BEST STORES UNIQUE TO BEIRUT AND WHAT CAN YOU FIND THERE?
Bokja for embroidery that highlights the talents of refugees; Nada Debs, for eclectic furnishings; Sarah’s Bags for hand-crafted accessories with a social impact; Rabih Kayrouz, for timeless statement pieces. Artisans du Liban also highlights the work of local artisans.

 

ANY ANTIQUE STORES YOU’D RECOMMEND?
Bokja is a treasure trove of antique textiles and reclaimed furniture.

 

ANYWHERE YOU WOULD AVOID (LIKE A TOURISTY SPOT THAT PEOPLE RECOMMEND THAT YOU THINK IS OVERRATED?)
Luckily nowhere in Beirut is over-touristed, but don’t expect to find an old souk. The historical market place was leveled during the civil war. It has been redeveloped into a glitzy area with streets filled with luxury labels like Hermès that is called the souk but is more of a fancy mall.

Scenic Pigeon’s Rock. Photo Courtesy of Melissa Biggs Bradley.

ANYTHING A VISITOR SHOULD BE AWARE OF PRIOR TO VISITING?
Beirut is again in the midst of rebirth, and so visiting now is like getting to see a destination during dress rehearsal for its return to the world stage. The kinks are not all worked out, so you get to witness the creative process, the mistakes and the recoveries, the blunders and the brainstorms. It is currently listed by the State Department as a Reconsider Travel destination so you should be fully aware of travel advisories.

 

NAME THREE FAVORITE CULTURAL INSITUTIONS (MUSEUMS/GALLERIES/FOUNDATIONS)?
Sursock Museum, one of Beirut’s best modern and contemporary art museums; the National Museum of Beirut, the principal museum of archaeology in Lebanon; and the Archaeological Museum at the American University of Beirut, which also has beautiful grounds that have been declared a botanical garden.

 

Melissa Biggs Bradley in the National Gallery. Photo Courtesy of Melissa Biggs-Bradley.

ANY NOTABLE NEIGHBORHOODS YOU WOULDN’T MISS?
Corniche, the seaside promenade connecting eastern and western Beirut. It has spectacular views and the popular Sporting Beach Club, an outdoor pool and restaurant that has been managed by the same family for the past half-century. 

 

ANY INSIDER SECRETS TO SHARE?
If you’re visiting on a Saturday, stop by the Souk el Tayeb, the weekly farmers’ market, where you can try fresh mannoush, a type of Lebanese pizza normally eaten for breakfast.

 

ANY SONGS, ALBUMS OR PLAYLISTS THAT REMIND YOU OF THE CITY?
I highly recommend everyone watch the film Capernaum, directed by Nadine Labaki. Set in Beirut, the documentary tackles a new form of social activism and is the first Lebanese film to be nominated for an Oscar. Oprah even tweeted that everyone should watch it. 

 

Bokja. Photo Courtesy of Melissa Biggs Bradley.

IF SOMEONE WANTED TO COMBINE BEIRUT WITH ANOTHER DESTINATION, WHERE WOULD YOU RECOMMEND?
Beirut is a destination in its own right, as there are so many day trips to take beyond the city. However, Paris or Istanbul have regular flights to Beirut and make great complimentary stopovers since both have influenced Beirut.

 

WHEN ARE YOU NEXT RETURNING? WE HEAR YOU ARE DOING A TRIP WITH AD. 
I am returning in April, leading an Insider Journey with Gay Gassmann, AD’s contributing editor based in Europe. This inaugural Lebanon journey will include expert-guided touring, private visits to top design houses, cultural activities like a cooking class with locals, and festive meals at palaces and restaurants.

 

FAVORITE MEMORY OF THE CITY.
There is not one memory that stands out beyond the extraordinary people I met. There are many traits attributed to Lebanese, but perhaps the most universally acknowledged are a zest for enjoying life and a welcoming attitude toward guests. When you visit, you will frequently hear the Arabic greeting “ahlan wasahlan,” which means Welcome, but is literally translated, “you’ve come to stay with family.”

 

TO YOU, BEIRUT IS… a lesson in life with lots of beauty but also tragedy. Anthony Bourdain said it best when he visited: “The food’s delicious, the people are awesome. It’s a party town. And everything wrong with the world is there.”

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Land of Rebecca Gardner: The Event Designer on her Favorite Resources and the Hors d’Oeuvre that Works for Every Single Party

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Gardner by Chia Chong

 

As the founder and creative director of event and interiors collective, Houses & Parties, Rebecca Gardner knows how to put on soirées that are as cheeky and fun as they are awe-strikingly beautiful. Based in Savannah, Georgia, and New York City, Rebecca has put on some of the prettiest parties to ever grace your Instagram feed. In that, we were thrilled when Rebecca tapped us to provide Land of Belle glassware for a set of dinner parties she designed at The Chatwal Hotel for Marriott International’s luxury hotel groups. We sat down with the designer to learn more about the event, her entertaining favorites, and greatest sources of inspiration.


TELL US ABOUT THE MILUX EVENT.

The Marriott International Luxury Brands include The Ritz-Carlton, St. Regis, Bulgari Hotels and the Luxury Collection. The MILUX hotel leaders hosted this intimate dinner for press to celebrate the developments of 2019.

 

DESCRIBE THE VENUE, DECOR, MENU, TABLESCAPES, AND MOOD OF THE EVENING. 

The dinner took place in the Stanford White Studio upstairs at the Chatwal Hotel. This Historic Landmark room has beautiful paneling, loads of bookshelves and a cozy fireplace which was a great start for our dinner “at home.” We layered antique oriental rugs on the floor, used green velvet sofas for seating and filled the room with a explosion of flowering branches. The Herend china is quite grown-up so we chose Annabelle’s Murano tumblers to play with pattern and bring a bohemian breeze. The Sabre bamboo flatware is one of our staples. It offers fine things a little youth.

 

Photograph by William Laird

WHAT WAS  YOUR JUMPING OFF POINT FOR INSPIRATION FOR THIS EVENT? 

In the spirit of Mario Buatta, this party started with a hundred yards of Lee Jofa chintz. We put it on the tables, the chair cushions, the ruffled throw pillows and the shades of little table lamps. The repetition packed a punch.


WHAT KEY ELEMENTS DO YOU GENERALLY WORK WITH TO BRING YOUR VISION FOR THE EVENT TO LIFE?

I like dressy parties with many layers of detail and romantic light. Guests walk in knowing that the evening is a treat – a gift from the host. However, there is nothing worse than fussy and boring. I insist on a little mischief. Do you see the collection of tiny porcelain figurines that peek from behind floppy poppies? They are weird and wonderful.

Land of Belle Iznik plates, crimson fringe napkins, bamboo flatware, and assorted glassware. Photograph by William Laird.


ANY SECRETS TO PERFECTING THE ART OF A FESTIVE TABLESCAPE? 

The perfect tablescape has lots of color, texture and pattern. The flowers smell good. The lighting makes you look beautiful. There is something fancy, something casual and something surprising.

 

ANY ASPECTS OF AN EVENT THAT ARE OFTEN OVER-LOOKED AND SHOULDN’T BE? 

You can go on forever with decor, but the most important part of the party is the guests. Be thoughtful with your guest list and included different ages, backgrounds and interests. It’s far more fun. Take the time to introduce strangers, be thoughtful about seating and distribute the “screaming blasts” evenly around tables.

 

DESCRIBE YOUR AESTHETIC IN FIVE WORDS OR LESS? 

Irreverent
Colorful
Surprising
Confident
Fantasy

 

COLORS OR NEUTRALS. IF COLORS, WHICH COLORS DO YOU FIND YOURSELF GRAVITATING TOWARDS? 

Pink, red and pink. They are the most flattering and festive.

 

IF YOU COULD TAP ANYONE, LIVING OR DEAD, TO DESIGN YOUR HOME, WHO WOULD IT BE? 

I dream (often – day and night) that Jeffrey Bilhuber designs my house with furniture from W. Gardner Ltd Antiques.

 

IF YOU COULD PLAN AN EVENT FOR ANYONE, LIVING OR DEAD, WHAT KIND OF EVENT WOULD IT BE AND WHO FOR? 

Cleopatra. She recognized the power in a party and had magnificent budgets.

Photograph by William Laird


WHAT’S A PLACE YOU’VE VISITED THAT HAS MOST INSPIRED YOUR EVENT PLANNING OR HOME DECOR? 

Venice is a constant source of inspiration – the colors are rich, the food is delicious and there is an unleashed appetite for decadence.


NAME YOUR THREE FAVORITE HOTELS. 

Hotel Duc de Saint Simon in Paris
The Gritti Palace in Venice
The Capri in Marfa, Texas

 

WHERE ARE YOU TRAVELING NEXT? 

I leave Friday to see the California Gray Whale migration off the coast of Mexico. I have no idea what to expect except adventure and margaritas.

 

WHAT DESTINATION IS ON THE TOP OF YOUR TRAVEL WISHLIST? 

I am dying to explore India, her great temples and neon colors.


ANY HORS D’OEUVRES YOU LIKE TO SERVE WHEN ENTERTAINING? 

Every occasion and every crowd calls for pigs-in-a-blanket on a silver tray. They’re a little tacky, indulgent and unexpected.


WHAT ARE 2-3 INGREDIENTS TO A SUCCESSFUL DINNER PARTY?

Guest list
Low lighting
Strong drinks

Photograph by William Laird


GIVE US A FEW RECOMMENDATIONS FOR YOUR FAVORITE CATERERS OR FLORISTS? WHERE ARE THEY BASED? 

Emily Thompson did the flowers for the MILUX dinner. She is an unbridled dreamer and consummate professional. We often collaborate. Taylor at Fox Fodder Farm is a fabulously talented florist. I love her wild and luscious approach. She’s never afraid to do crazy. Peter Callahan is the best caterer in New York. He is excruciatingly detailed and demands excellence. My parties are safe in his hands.


WHAT SONGS, ARTISTS, OR GENRES ARE ON YOUR GO-TO PLAYLIST FOR A GET-TOGETHER AT HOME? 

Oh, I’m so predictable when it comes to music. Pink Martini is for everything from cocktails to laundry. Bobby Darin can start a party and Dr. Dre can keep it going.


ANY FAVORITE CANDLES TO BURN WHEN ENTERTAINING? 

I’m not a fan of scented candles during parties. The smells mix with food and it can be offensive. At home, Kate Brodsky’s KRB candle wins all awards. It is perky and smells like freshly cut greens.


ANY FAVORITE WINES OR COCKTAILS TO SERVE AT HOME OR TO BRING TO A DINNER? 

A strong, classic Old Fashioned makes everyone dance like Patrick Swayze. Otherwise, I like to pass drinks that looks good in a champagne coupe.


ANY DINNER GUEST PET PEEVES? 

If you say you’re coming – show up.


WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO HOSTESS GIFT? 

A bottle of quality champagne is an elegant hostess gift but nothing is more gracious than a handwritten note.

Photograph by William Laird

DO YOU COLLECT ANYTHING? 

I have a collection of insect tremblant brooches and I’m always looking for just one more. My prize is a 1930s emerald dragonfly – his wings move when I laugh and he’s magic.


WHAT EVENT DESIGN “RULE” IS MEANT TO BE BROKEN? 

Know the rules before you break them.


WHAT INSTAGRAM ACCOUNTS TO YOU FOLLOW FOR INSPIRATION? 

@happymenocalstudio for delight
@wgardner51 for treasures
@nickolsenstyle for color
@modaoperandi for clothes
@courtlandandco for linens
@petercopping for beauty


WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE ASPECT OF PLAYING HOST? 

Being in control. Just kidding.


THE QUINTESSENTIAL HOST ALWAYS… 

…pretends to be calm and makes sure everyone has a lively
conversation and a full drink.